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Conversation

A CONVERSATION WITH
ALEX JENKINS

Finding out about a person is never easy, and that’s why I decided to be interviewed. This medium is an ideal way of finding out a little bit about a person, and what makes them tick. Hopefully, you’ll agree.

I encourage you to read the interview below – it was quite a surprise even for me how it went, and you can see who I am, and how I work – and you’re certain to find a few surprises!

Alex We know you as an IT expert; someone who seeks out problems that need solving, and someone who’s a master at your craft. But what we don’t know about you is how you got to be this person;
what I suppose people will want to know is who the real Alex Jenkins truly is. Who is he?
So who are you? What has made your life take the path it has, and where are you now?
So what’s your story? How has the personal life of Alex Jenkins impacted on the business side, and vice versa?
How so? What did the military offer you?
So friendship is important to you?
So you’ve developed the skill of team-player?
what I suppose people will want to know is who the real Alex Jenkins truly is. Who is he?

Oh! You start with the easy questions! [laughs] Who am I? Well, frankly, I’m the person who’s made it here – in the here and now – and is still alive! But seriously, I could say that I’m a success; a winner – someone who’s achieved his life’s goals – but that wouldn’t be strictly true – that would just be bluster.

So who are you? What has made your life take the path it has, and where are you now?

Well, I suppose that I’m a product of the life that everyone knows – but that wouldn’t be the full picture. Who I am is the result of a successful business life, for sure – but my personal life has made a significant impact on my business persona.

So what’s your story? How has the personal life of Alex Jenkins impacted on the business side, and vice versa?

It’s a tough question, but I suppose on reflection, that there have been some major influences from my personal life into my business life. We could start with the military – it was a great start for me and taught me not only the skills I worked on later down the road, but it was the feeling of camaraderie.

How so? What did the military offer you?

It began with basic training; I felt so comfortable there, and the friends I made back then have stayed with me a lifetime.

So friendship is important to you?

Oh! It’s essential! You know that the thing the military drills into you more than discipline, is the idea that you’re there for the others, you know? One of the first things I took a liking to was the water; I loved the idea of working with scuba. You know you develop a love for a particular activity fairly quickly, but the people I was with – they just made the transition to scuba training feel so completely natural. Do you get to explore parts of the world that many don’t get to see, have a place to escape the daily grind of technology that you’re taught in the labs, you know? It’s a form of Zen almost – you get to experience the world that exists beneath the surface of the water. It’s the nearest thing to being an astronaut. You experience weightlessness, and you also get to visit the history that has been lost to time and sits waiting under the waves. You get to be a ‘team-player’ where the meaning of a team isn’t just a smart word, but actually is the thing that can save your life!

I went a long way with scuba – I quickly progressed from open water diving that I did with my team-mates and quickly became a Master Scuba Diver Trainer. And funnily enough, most people have the thought that Master Diver is the highest level of training you can do – but actually, I’m three full levels above this! Today – and I’ve spent many years working on this – I can teach more than 18 speciality courses.

So you’ve developed the skill of team-player?

Oh, absolutely! While I’ve built this skill steadily from childhood – I was a scout and an air cadet, by the way! – so being part of a unit has always been the core proficiency I’ve developed; my life experiences have taught me reliability, how to communicate constructively, the art of listening actively, and being an active participant who likes to get his hands dirty and solve problems for everyone who’s involved.

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